Rule proposed to level the playing field for organic dairies

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest A policy that allows a one-time transition of dairy cows from conventional to organic production has been inconsistently enforced, putting farmers who play by the rules at a competitive disadvantage and undermining the integrity of the organic label. However, a proposed rule would level the playing field by more clearly defining current regulations.The Origin of Livestock proposed rule, which was originally published in 2015 but has not yet been finalized, would allow organic dairy farms to transition conventional replacement animals into organic production only once, prohibiting the continuous transition that some farms have incorrectly practiced. In comments submitted, National Farmers Union (NFU), a longtime advocate of fair and commonsense organic rules and regulations, voiced support for the rule and urged its immediate finalization and implementation.“The organic label is only as meaningful as the enforcement of organic standards. But currently, the origin of livestock provisions are being applied inconsistently across the industry, allowing some farmers to repeatedly transition conventional replacement animals into organic production while others comply with the rules and only transition a single, distinct herd once. This practice not only confuses American consumers, who have certain expectations about what the organic label means, but also puts rule-abiding producers at a significant disadvantage and threatens the integrity of the organic program,” said Roger Johnson, NFU President . “By providing greater clarity on transition regulations and ensuring that standards are uniformly applied, the Origin of Livestock proposed rule would protect consumer confidence in the organic label and ensure its economic viability for family farmers. We urge USDA to act quickly to finalize and implement this crucial rule.”last_img read more

Sweaty Southern Slabs

first_imgIf you live anywhere in a warm, humid coastal area, you’re no doubt familiar with wet concrete in winter. Some days you walk outside and find the carport slab is soaking wet. How did it happen? Did rain blow into the carport? If it’s not rain, is it moisture from the ground that came up through the concrete? Could it be condensation from the water vapor in the air? Let’s take a look.I took the photo at right on a February day in New Orleans a few years ago and it perfectly demonstrates the physics of this phenomenon. What you’re looking at are the stone steps and pavers near Jackson Square. They were mostly wet — but the water didn’t get there from rain or any other liquid water source above the stone.Could the water have come from below? The photo above doesn’t eliminate that possibility. Notice the nose of the steps. That part of the stone was dry. It wasn’t directly in contact with the ground, having a bit of air beneath, so maybe the water did come from below.But no, that’s not the answer either. Photo #2 (below) was taken nearby at about the same time. The sidewalk and steps were completely dry. The critical difference between the two locations was shade. The dry area was open to the sky. That kept the stone warmer than the other stone, which was under tree cover.It’s condensationLet’s go back to the lead photo. The stone there was wet because of condensation. The nose of the steps was dry because it was warmer. That part of the stone had air on three sides. That warmed it up enough that it could be above the dew point.When does this happen? I’ve spent many years of my life in Houston, south Louisiana, and Florida, so I’m familiar with this condition. It happens in winter, after there’s been a cold snap. A cold front comes through and chills the ground, the sidewalks, and the concrete slabs. Then it moves out, being replaced by a mass of warm, humid air. The air temperature rises into the 60s or 70s Fahrenheit, maybe even 80°F.The dew point of the water vapor in that air can be 70°F or higher. When it finds that cold concrete or stone in contact with the ground, you get condensation. It’s possible to see condensation on open areas, but you’ll more often see it on shaded surfaces because those areas stay cool longer.When you can look at something like that and figure out what’s going on, you can figure out all kinds of moisture problems that occur in buildings, too. Allison Bailes of Decatur, Georgia, is a speaker, writer, building science consultant, and the author of the Energy Vanguard Blog. You can follow him on Twitter at @EnergyVanguard.last_img read more

a month agoTottenham chairman Levy fought off Chelsea attempts for Pochettino

first_imgTottenham chairman Levy fought off Chelsea attempts for Pochettinoby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveTottenham chairman Daniel Levy fought off attempts by Chelsea to prise Mauricio Pochettino away, it has been revealed.The Sun says Levy previously rejected an unofficial approach from Chelsea for Pochettino.Pochettino has impressed as Spurs boss over the past five years, though Tottenham have struggled at the start of this season.They have won just two of their opening six Premier League matches and were dumped out of the Carabao Cup by League Two Colchester.It’s led to questions over Pochettino’s future after the Argentine regularly voiced his disapproval over the club’s transfer policy in the summer.But Spurs chairman Levy is clearly keen to keep Pochettino.He turned down an official approach from Real Madrid and an unofficial move by Chelsea for his manager. TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Video: Florida Kicker Eddy Pinerio Drills 62-Yarder During 1st Day On Campus

first_imgTwo Florida Gators helmets sitting on the field.KNOXVILLE, TN – SEPTEMBER 15: Florida Gators football helmets on the field before the game against the Tennessee Volunteers at Neyland Stadium on September 15, 2012 in Knoxville, Tennessee. (Photo by John Sommers II/Getty Images)Your kicker woes may be over pretty soon, Florida fans. This season, the Gators kickers really struggled, converting on 36-of-41 extra points and just 7-of-17 field goals. In steps junior college star Eddy Pineiro, who promises to take care of that important spot. During his first day on campus in Gainesville, Pineiro messed around and drilled a 62-yarder.62 yarder in my new home pic.twitter.com/CQ6nDQ6k3P— Odell Kickem Pineiro (@eddypineiro1) January 6, 2016Based on Twitter, Pineiro is having a pretty good first day overall.Finally moved in— Odell Kickem Pineiro (@eddypineiro1) January 3, 2016All the hard work paying finally got my locker pic.twitter.com/9iNQTSJ1Xs— Odell Kickem Pineiro (@eddypineiro1) January 5, 2016People sleep on the impact having a great kicker has, but expect this to be a very big deal for the Gators next season.last_img read more

Virgin Melbourne T3 makeover

first_imgIn an effort to further enhance the domestic passengers travel experience, Virgin Australia together with Melbourne airport has commenced significant refurbishments to Terminal 3 (T3).Virgin Australia chief operating officer Sean Donohue said the refurbishment is part of a series of initiatives which highlight the importance of the Victorian capital to the airlines operations.Some of the initiatives include the opening of a high quality new corporate lounge, new trans-continental A330 service and increased flight frequencies to Brisbane, Sydney and Hobart.“Melbourne is one of our busiest domestic airports and we serve over a million guests every year more than 19,000 every single day,” Mr Donohue said.Mr Donohue said that in addition to these upgrades they are also on track to introduce a Premium Valet service at Melbourne Airport later in the year.Melbourne Airport chief executive officer Chris Woodruff said the T3 refurbishment is part of the Airport’s investment of A$1 billion on infrastructure upgrades over the next five years.“We are pleased to be working closely with Virgin Australia on this project to deliver a better experience for our passengers,” Mr Woodruff said.“All flights will continue to operate normally from T3 during the refurbishment, and we’ll be working closely with Virgin Australia and our other airline customers to minimise inconvenience for passengers while the work is being carried out. Source = e-Travel Blackboard: S.Plast_img read more

Interviewed by Louis James Casey Research The

first_img(Interviewed by Louis James, Casey Research) The government shutdown is over, and many Americans are breathing a sigh of relief. But there’s no reason to take a shutdown seriously in the first place, said famous resource speculator and libertarian freethinker Doug Casey in a recent interview—it was just a paid holiday for useless public employees anyway… L: Doug, the topic of the day is the government shutdown— Doug: If only it were true! L: [Laughs] Don’t hold back, Doug… Doug: Well, it’s Orwellian doublespeak to call it a “shutdown,” when all they do is furlough a few nonessential personnel and then hire many of them back again the next week—with pay for the time off. The so-called shutdown is nothing more than a paid holiday for many federal employees. It’s business as usual in Washington DC. They close the Washington Monument and actually go out of their way to prevent people from even seeing Mt. Rushmore from the highway. It’s strange that there still seem to be plenty of park police around to arrest you if you disregard the signs they posted saying everything is closed. If only there were more Americans like those WWII vets who wanted to visit the WWII Memorial. If they hadn’t been a bunch of old guys, some in wheelchairs, who can say there might not have been another incident like the one last week in which Miriam Carey was murdered by police in her car, even though her baby was in the car as well. Despite the fact that she had no gun, this act was applauded by congresspeople. Then there was the chap who self-immolated the next day in sight of the Capitol, and the story of ordinary, peaceful tourists being evicted by gun-toting squads in uniform from Yellowstone Park—these are strange days. I think we’ll see more of this, stemming from a strategy to inconvenience people as much as possible, generate anxiety, and make them believe that they need the government. L: Perhaps so, but not to get sidetracked, some government workers have been told to stay home and are not being paid. Won’t that save the US taxpayer a little money? Doug: No. Not at all. These people are all going to get back-pay when they return to their places of employment—I hesitate to say “work,” since what most of them do is unproductive or counterproductive activity, not work. The problem is that citizens who need their papers stamped, permissions granted, and so forth are forced to sit on their hands in the meantime. So the economic losses blamed on the shutdown are caused not by the fact the government employees aren’t at their desks—but by the fact they’re made artificially necessary in the first place. They’ll put them all back to work soon enough after their paid vacations. And then many will be able to collect overtime pay to catch up on the backlog. The backlog will be a good excuse to hire even more of them. I promise you that absolutely nothing will change because of this exercise in Kabuki theater. Don’t be fooled: while the rate of increase may be trimmed at times—with much fanfare about “cuts” that are nothing more than reduced increases—the overall trend is relentlessly upward. There is simply no political force in the United States to stop it. It’s like the Fed’s purchases of $85 billion of paper a month: if they stop, the chances are excellent it will bring the house of cards down. They’ve painted themselves into a corner. L: Fine. I see it the same way, but let’s go back to your first statement. If the government were truly shut down overnight, wouldn’t the resulting chaos give pause to even an anarchist like you? Doug: People said the same thing about ending slavery in the United States; freeing the slaves all at once would result overnight in a large fraction of the population with no education, no money, and no prospects being left to their own devices. It was said that this would lead to great calamity and bloodshed. But when the slaves were freed, they immediately got to work turning fallow land into prospering farms and building whole new towns from scratch. Another example is offered by the demustering of 10 million servicemen after WWII. Many people feared that would result in chaos—but just the opposite happened. Today, if all these government employees were permanently unemployed—fired—and their jobs abolished, it would be a huge plus for all concerned. Of course, there would be some unpleasantness if the US government disappeared overnight, but only from those who have come to depend on it. Americans who actually produce something would have cause for celebration. Let me re-emphasize something that many people forget: There is absolutely no needed or wanted service provided by the government that wouldn’t be provided—undoubtedly much better and cheaper—by entrepreneurs if the government disappeared. Further, we’d have vastly more goods and services if the state weren’t there to prevent their creation. The economy would go into a super boom after the distortions that have been cranked into the system over decades were eliminated. (Doug Casey is the master of radical solutions… so how does he think the US government’s debt problem should be solved? Click here to read the full interview—including Doug’s astonishing answer and his warnings of the economic turmoil you should prepare for.)last_img read more